June 25, 2018

Can You be Sued for Non-payment of your Mortgage if You Do Not Reaffirm?

I recently received an email from a blog reader asking about his obligations to his mortgage company when he does not reaffirm:

I have read your blog and you are very through so I write you with hopes that you might answer this question for me. I file Chapter 7  in 08, and did not reaffirm my loan. I am still living in the house and did make some payments. However, i have not for the last 8 months. It is my understanding that I must sign a document to reaffirm and that continuing payment in itself is not a reaffirmation…or?  Well it gets a little more complicated.  My house is valued at $410,000 and the bank has offered me a deal that is going to be hard to refuse. They have agreed to let me do a short re-fi in the amount of 180k.  If I agree to that is that in itself a reaffirmation?

Here is my response: in most cases, when you take out a mortgage loan, you are signing two different types of agreements.  The first type is a promissory note whereby you personally agree to make the payments.  The second type of obligation creates a property lien, meaning that you, as the owner of the property, pledges that property as collateral for the loan.

When you file a Chapter 7 and receive your discharge, your personal obligations are extinguished.  However, a Chapter 7 discharge does not eliminate the mortgage company’s lien against your property.  If you “reaffirm” your mortgage, you are actually reaffirming the promissory note and your personal obligations to pay.

For years, many bankruptcy attorneys advised their clients to avoid signing reaffirmation agreements for mortgages, car loans or any other secured debt.  The reasoning – even without a personal “guarantee” lenders are protected by the property lien.  If the lender is willing to accept payments (the so-called “stay and pay” option), the now discharged debtor keeps his property, keeps making payment, but does not have personal liability on the note. [Read more…]

Do I Have to Give Back the Car I am Financing if I File a Chapter 7?

I have a question about the blog in Nov,2006.  You said that filing bankruptcy can stop car repossion .  But after you file chapter 7 do you get to keep the car and the debt is discharged or you can keep the car only if you promise to make payments on tht vehicle.  Because I have been told the only way you can keep the car when filing chapter 7 is if you promise to make payments and you do not include it in your chapter 7 bankruptcy.  I was told if you owe on the vehicle and place it in your chapter 7 bankruptcy you have to give the car back. Could you give me some insight.
–Fana

Jonathan Ginsberg responds:  Fana, the minute you file a bankruptcy, all creditor action stops because of something called the "automatic stay."   There are a few exceptions to the automatic stay (i.e. multiple filings, child support debt, and a few other limited categories), but as a rule, all creditor action stops the minute you file.

Chapter 7 is primarily designed to get rid of unsecured debts like credit cards and medical bills.  In a Chapter 7, secured debts must be either reaffirmed or the collateral must be surrendered to the secured creditor.

Automobile loans are considered secured debts because the vehicle you purchased serves as security for the loan.  If you want to keep your vehicle in a Chapter 7, you must reaffirm it.  Reaffirmation of a vehicle loan is voluntary on the part of the secured creditor.  Generally, most car lenders will reaffirm if:

you are current with your payments

you have enough income to pay for the reaffirmed debt in your budget

your are able to shelter (exempt) your equity, if any, as part of your Chapter 7 petition

If the creditor refuses to reaffirm your choices are to surrender the vehicle or to convert to Chapter 13 where you can try to force a repayment down the lender’s throat.

If you do nothing – do not reaffirm and do not state any intention, the Bankruptcy Code will presume that your intention was to surrender and after the bankruptcy is over, the secured lender can repossess the vehicle.  Note that in this situation you would have no personal liability for a repossession deficiency – the Chapter 7 discharge serves to wipe out your personal liability.  However, the lien (in rem jurisdiction) that encumbers the vehicle remains and survives the bankruptcy.

So, if you are financing a vehicle and you file Chapter 7, there is a good chance that you can keep your vehicle if you qualify for a reaffirmation.

Page optimized by WP Minify WordPress Plugin