November 25, 2017

Relief From Your 72 Month Car Loan

cram downFinancial experts bemoan the “crisis” in student loan debt (over $1.2 trillion as of 2015) and the rising rates of credit card debt ($733 billion as of 2015) but no one seems to be talking about yet another debt bubble – the huge rise of auto loan debt.

In 2012, total auto loan debt in the United States passed $1 trillion. Currently, the average household owes over $27,000 to vehicle lenders. More problematic, many of these loans extend well beyond 3 or 4 years. According to Edmunds.com, as of 2014, over 60% of auto loans were for terms over 60 months, with nearly 20% of these loans using 72 to 84 month terms.

60 months, of course, equals 5 years. 72 months equals 6 years, and 84 months equals 7 years.

Why a Long Term Vehicle Loan Means Trouble

You may ask “why should I be concerned about signing a 60 or 72 month car loan if I can afford the payment?” The answer, in a word, is “depreciation.”

Cars and trucks are depreciating assets. This means that they go down in value with each day and each mile of wear and tear. When you sign off on a 5 year or longer loan, you won’t be break even on your loan for at least 3 years. All your payments through at least year 3 (and most likely longer) will be applied to interest only. And my experience has been that folks who pursue long term vehicle loans often have less than perfect credit such that their interest rates are 7%, 8% or even higher.

This means that if your vehicle breaks down, or if you want to replace your car or truck 3 or 4 years into the loan, you will have to come out of pocket to satisfy the loan. If your vehicle is totaled in a wreck before the break even point, you will have to come out of pocket to pay off the loan because insurance companies pay property damage settlement based on “low retail” value.

If the dealership offers to “roll your existing payment” into a new loan, you’ll end up paying even more, because the new loan will include the leftover finance costs from the original loan plus the unfavorable terms from the new loan.

In essence, a 5 year or longer car loan equals a long term rental, except that you bear all the risk of loss. In case I am not being clear, a 5 year or longer loan is a toxic loan, and almost never a good idea. Even 4 year loans are less than ideal. [Read more…]

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